Snowy Scene ID'd Civil War Veteran Confederate Major Soldier
Snowy Scene ID'd Civil War Veteran Confederate Major Soldier
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Snowy Scene ID'd Civil War Veteran Confederate Major Soldier

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Original cabinet card showing Harrison Word Burton, photographed in a sleigh with faux snow effects added to the image. Burton (1840-1902) was a CSA Major during
the Civil War. At the bottom of this listing is his bio, that I found online.

Photographed by G. Cramer in Saint Louis, Missouri; Signed and dated on the back in pencil:

St. Louis
Dec. 1881
Harrison Word Burton

Cabinet card is 6.4" x 4.25" and in very good antique condition.

Another comrade has been called to answer the last roll call. Harrison Word Burton died at Corsicana, Texas, on July 12, 1902, after an illness of several weeks. He was born in Buckingham Co. VA, August 30, 1840, and reared in Richmond. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Co D, First Virginia Regiment, commanded by Col. P. T. Moore. After a year in the infantry, he re-enlisted in the Otey Battery of Richmond (Capt. George Gaston Otey) in which he served to the end of war. After the surrender he returned to Richmond and remained there for a short while; and then, moving to Petersburg, he took a position on the staff of the "Petersburg Index and Appeal". He wrote under the nom de plume of "Harry Scratch." He married Miss Mary Virginia Tappey, of Petersburg, who survives him. In 1877 he moved to St. Louis, MO, where he was appointed on the Governor's staff, with the rank of major. After a few years in St. Lewis, he moved to Texas, where he lived up to the time of his death. He leaves an only brother, Robert C. Burton, of Baltimore, who served side by side with him in the same commands. Major Burton was a man who will be sadly missed in his community. His fine character and noble qualities earned for him hosts of friends, in whose hearts his place will not soon be filled. He was a Mason in good standing and a prominent member of the Presbyterian Church, and a member of Camp Winkler, U. C. V. Major Burton was a justice of the peace at the time of his death, and was unusually popular with all classes. He was genial, kind-hearted, a good friend, and above reproach.